Cultivation of algae, mussels, common reed and microbes could help to improve the Baltic Sea’s condition

Cultivation of algae, mussels, common reed and microbes could help to improve the Baltic Sea’s condition

Marine biologists have investigated new ways of utilizing the Baltic Sea’s resources. Over three years, the project has looked at various ways of utilizing macroalgae and microalgae, mussels, common reed and microbes. New fish farming methods and future use of wave energy installations in the Baltic Sea were also examined, along with opportunities for using offshore wind park areas for other economic activities.

via ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News:

Sep. 3, 2013 — The Finnish Environment Institute SYKE has participated in the SUBMARINER project, jointly performed by eight countries in order to investigate new ways of utilising the Baltic Sea’s resources. Over three years, the project has looked at various ways of utilising macroalgae and microalgae, mussels, common reed and microbes. New fish farming methods and future use of wave energy installations in the Baltic Sea were also examined, along with opportunities for using offshore wind park areas for other economic activities.”Executed correctly, these new ways of using the sea would cause no harm to the marine environment. Instead, by cultivating algae, mussels or common reed we can remove nutrients from the sea and even improve its condition,” explains Senior Researcher Jukka Seppälä from SYKE’s Marine Research Centre.With the exception of Russia, all Baltic Sea coastal states are participating in the project. Finland is represented by SYKE. The project is mainly funded by the EU’s Baltic Sea Region Programme, which is aimed at promoting an economically and ecologically sustainable Baltic Sea region.New methods of removing nutrients from the Baltic SeaFinland’s part of the project involved testing of macroalgae cultivation in the sea in Rymättylä and Tvärminne. In addition, the possibilities of cultivating microalgae in under Nordic conditions were investigated.It was discovered that cultivating mussels on substrates constructed of ropes was a more efficient method of removing nutrients from the sea than macroalgae cultivation. The Baltic Sea region’s ice winters pose a specific challenge to mussel and macroalgae cultivation, as the substrates need to be lowered below the water level. The project also looked into the possibilities of using mussel and algae mass as animal feed, fertiliser or in the production of biogas. …

For more info: Cultivation of algae, mussels, common reed and microbes could help to improve the Baltic Sea’s condition

ScienceDaily: Agriculture and Food News

Cultivation of algae, mussels, common reed and microbes could help to improve the Baltic Sea’s condition

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