Deep-sea squid with tentacle tips that ‘swim’ on their own

Deep-sea squid with tentacle tips that ‘swim’ on their own

Many deep-sea animals such as anglerfish use parts of their body as lures to attract prey. Researchers have now described a deep-sea squid whose tentacle tips flap and flutter as if swimming on their own. The researchers hypothesize that the motion of these tentacle tips may induce small shrimp and other animals to approach within reach of the squid’s arms.

via ScienceDaily: Top Science News:

Sep. 3, 2013 — Many deep-sea animals such as anglerfish use parts of their body as lures to attract prey. Some deep-sea squids may use this strategy as well. In a recent paper, researchers associated with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) describe a deep-sea squid that appears to use a different method to lure prey — its tentacle tips flap and flutter as if swimming on their own. The researchers hypothesize that the motion of these tentacle tips may induce small shrimp and other animals to approach within reach of the squid’s arms.Most squids have eight arms and two longer “feeding” tentacles. The tips of the tentacles, which are often broader and armed with suckers or hooks, are known as “clubs.” Such squids hunt by rapidly extending their tentacles and then grabbing prey with their clubs. The squids also use the tentacles to carry captured prey to their mouths.The deep-sea squid Grimalditeuthis bonplandi seems to use a very different feeding strategy. A slow swimmer with a weak, gelatinous body, its tentacles are long, thin, fragile, and too weak to capture prey. Unlike any other known squid, its tentacles do not have any suckers, hooks, or photophores (glowing spots).Until just a few years ago, the marine biologists had only seen specimens of G. bonplandi that were dead or dying after having been captured in deep-sea trawl nets. …

For more info: Deep-sea squid with tentacle tips that ‘swim’ on their own

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

Deep-sea squid with tentacle tips that ‘swim’ on their own

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