How quickly can a bacterium grow? E. coli can replicate close to thermodynamic limits of efficiency

How quickly can a bacterium grow? E. coli can replicate close to thermodynamic limits of efficiency

All living things must obey the laws of physics — including the second law of thermodynamics, which states that the universe’s disorder, or entropy, can only grow. Highly ordered cells and organisms appear to contradict this principle, but they actually do conform because they generate heat that increases the universe’s overall entropy.

via ScienceDaily: Top Science News:

Aug. 27, 2013 — All living things must obey the laws of physics — including the second law of thermodynamics, which states that the universe’s disorder, or entropy, can only grow. Highly ordered cells and organisms appear to contradict this principle, but they actually do conform because they generate heat that increases the universe’s overall entropy.Still, questions remain: What is the theoretical threshold for how much heat a living cell must generate to fulfill its thermodynamic constraints? And how closely do cells approach that limit?In a recent paper in the Journal of Chemical Physics, MIT physicist Jeremy England mathematically modeled the replication of E. coli bacteria and found that the process is nearly as efficient as possible: E. coli produce at most only about six times more heat than they need to meet the constraints of the second law of thermodynamics.”Given what the bacterium is made of, and given how rapidly it grows, what would be the minimum amount of heat that it would have to exhaust into its surroundings? When you compare that with the amount of heat it’s actually exhausting, they’re roughly on the same scale,” says England, an assistant professor of physics. “It’s relatively close to the maximum efficiency.”England’s approach to modeling biological systems involves statistical mechanics, which calculates the probabilities of different arrangements of atoms or molecules. He focused on the biological process of cell division, through which one cell becomes two. During the 20-minute replication process, a bacterium consumes a great deal of food, rearranges many of its molecules — including DNA and proteins — and then splits into two cells.To calculate the minimum amount of heat a bacterium needs to generate during this process, England decided to investigate the thermodynamics of the reverse process — that is, two cells becoming one. …

For more info: How quickly can a bacterium grow? E. coli can replicate close to thermodynamic limits of efficiency

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

How quickly can a bacterium grow? E. coli can replicate close to thermodynamic limits of efficiency

Utilizzando il sito, accetti l'utilizzo dei cookie da parte nostra. maggiori informazioni

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close