New electron beam writer enables next-gen biomedical and information technologies

New electron beam writer enables next-gen biomedical and information technologies

The new electron beam writer housed in the Nano3 cleanroom facility at the Qualcomm Institute is important for electrical engineering professor Shadi Dayeh’s two major areas of research. He is developing next-generation, nanoscale transistors for integrated electronics; and he is developing neural probes that have the capacity to extract electrical signals from individual brain cells and transmit the information to a prosthetic device or computer.

via ScienceDaily: Top Health News:

Aug. 12, 2013 — The new electron beam writer housed in the Nano3 cleanroom facility at the Qualcomm Institute is important for electrical engineering professor Shadi Dayeh’s two major areas of research. He is developing next-generation, nanoscale transistors for integrated electronics; and he is developing neural probes that have the capacity to extract electrical signals from individual brain cells and transmit the information to a prosthetic device or computer. Achieving this level of signal extraction or manipulation requires tiny sensors spaced very closely together for the highest resolution and signal acquisition. Enter the new electron beam writer.Electron beam (e-beam) lithography enables researchers to write very small patterns on large substrates with a high level of precision. It is a widely used tool in information technology and life science. Applications range from writing patterns on silicon and compound semiconductor chips for electronic device and materials research to genome sequencing platforms. But the ability to write patterns on the scale afforded by the Nano3 facility — with its minimum feature size of less than 8 nanometers on wafers with diameters that can be as large as 8 inches — is unique in Southern California. Before the facility opened earlier this year, the closest comparable e-beam writer was in Los Angeles. In an e-beam writer, unique patterns are “written” on a silicon wafer coated with a polymer resist layer that is sensitive to electron irradiation. …

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ScienceDaily: Top Health News

New electron beam writer enables next-gen biomedical and information technologies

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