Pathways activated in most K9 bone tumors not driving the worst bone tumors

Pathways activated in most K9 bone tumors not driving the worst bone tumors

A new study shows NOTCH signaling elevated in K9 osteosarcoma, but aspects of Notch signaling noticeably deactivated in the worst cancers.

via ScienceDaily: Top Health News:

July 23, 2013 — Many cancers show inappropriate activation of a cell signaling pathway called NOTCH. In the developing body, NOTCH tells brain cells to grow and proliferate. It should be quiet in the adult body, but cancers restart NOTCH to drive their own growth, far and beyond the rate of healthy tissues. A Colorado State University and University of Colorado Cancer Center study expected to find NOTCH signaling elevated in K9 osteosarcoma samples, gathered from patients at the CSU Flint Animal Cancer Center. What they found surprised the researchers: overall, NOTCH signaling was elevated in K9 osteosarcoma, but aspects of Notch signaling were noticeably deactivated in the worst cancers.”We split the samples into two groups: poor responders who had gone less than 100 days after treatment before the progression of their disease, and strong responders who had made it more than 300 days after their treatment without disease progression. Then we could explore the genetic differences between these two groups,” says Dawn Duval, PhD, CU Cancer Center investigator and associate professor of molecular oncology at Colorado State University.Specifically, Duval and colleagues including first author Deanna Dailey, DVM, looked at the expression of a protein called HES1, which is used as a proxy to test for NOTCH activation. High HES1 means that upstream, NOTCH is firing. Low HES1 means it’s not firing or that some other pathway is interfering. They expected to find a linear increase in HES1 as cancers and outcomes got worse — more HES1 would have meant more NOTCH signaling and results in other cancers imply that the more NOTCH, the worse the outcomes.”What we found is that the poor responders had lower HES1. That fit nothing we expected,” Duval says.The osteosarcoma samples from dogs with disease progression in the shortest amount of time, also had the lowest levels of HES1.”We had to go back and try to figure out what was happening, so we measured HES1 levels in normal bone samples and matched bone tumors. …

For more info: Pathways activated in most K9 bone tumors not driving the worst bone tumors

ScienceDaily: Top Health News

Pathways activated in most K9 bone tumors not driving the worst bone tumors

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