Daylight saving impacts timing of heart attacks

Daylight saving impacts timing of heart attacks

Still feeling the residual effects of springing ahead for daylight saving time? The hour of sleep lost — or gained — may play a bigger, perhaps more dangerous role in our body’s natural rhythm than we think. It seems moving the clock forward or backward may alter the timing of when heart attacks occur in the week following these time changes, according to research.

via All Top News — ScienceDaily:

Still feeling the residual effects of springing ahead for daylight saving time? The hour of sleep lost — or gained — may play a bigger, perhaps more dangerous role in our body’s natural rhythm than we think. It seems moving the clock forward or backward may alter the timing of when heart attacks occur in the week following these time changes, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session.Data from the largest study of its kind in the U.S. reveal a 25 percent jump in the number of heart attacks occurring the Monday after we “spring forward” compared to other Mondays during the year — a trend that remained even after accounting for seasonal variations in these events. But the study showed the opposite effect is also true. Researchers found a 21 percent drop in the number of heart attacks on the Tuesday after returning to standard time in the fall when we gain an hour back.”What’s interesting is that the total number of heart attacks didn’t change the week after daylight saving time,” said Amneet Sandhu, M.D., cardiology fellow, University of Colorado in Denver, and lead investigator of the study. “But these events were much more frequent the Monday after the spring time change and then tapered off over the other days of the week. It may mean that people who are already vulnerable to heart disease may be at greater risk right after sudden time changes.”Heart attacks historically occur most often on Monday mornings. Sandhu explains that in looking at other “normal” Mondays, there is some variation in events, but it is not significant. However, when he and his team compared admissions from a database of non-federal Michigan hospitals the Monday before the start of daylight saving time and the Monday immediately after for four consecutive years, they found a consistent 34 percent increase in heart attacks from one week to the next (93 heart attacks the Monday before compared to 125 the week after the start of daylight saving time for the duration of the study.).Although researchers cannot say what might be driving the shift in heart attack timing after the start of daylight saving time, they have a theory.”Perhaps the reason we see more heart attacks on Monday mornings is a combination of factors, including the stress of starting a new work week and inherent changes in our sleep-wake cycle,” Sandhu said. …

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All Top News — ScienceDaily

Daylight saving impacts timing of heart attacks

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