Characterization of stink bug saliva proteins opens door to controlling pests

Characterization of stink bug saliva proteins opens door to controlling pests

Brown marmorated stink bugs cause millions of dollars in crop losses across the United States because of the damage their saliva does to plant tissues. Researchers have now developed methods to extract the insect saliva and identify the major protein components, which could lead to new pest control approaches. “Other than using synthetic pesticides, there have been few alternative approaches to controlling these pests. By identifying the major protein components of saliva, it now may be possible to target the specific factors in saliva that are essential for their feeding and, therefore, design new approaches for controlling stink bugs,” states one of the authors.

via Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily:

Brown marmorated stink bugs cause millions of dollars in crop losses across the United States because of the damage their saliva does to plant tissues. Researchers at Penn State have developed methods to extract the insect saliva and identify the major protein components, which could lead to new pest control approaches.”Until now, essentially nothing was known about the composition of stink bug saliva, which is surprising given the importance of these insects as pests and the fact that their saliva is the primary cause of feeding injury to plants and crop losses,” said Gary Felton, professor and head of the Department of Entomology. “Other than using synthetic pesticides, there have been few alternative approaches to controlling these pests. By identifying the major protein components of saliva, it now may be possible to target the specific factors in saliva that are essential for their feeding and, therefore, design new approaches for controlling stink bugs.”The team reported its results in PLOS ONE.According to Felton, stink bugs produce two types of saliva that are required for successful feeding. Watery saliva helps stink bugs to digest their food. Sheath saliva surrounds stink bugs’ mouthparts and hardens to prevent spillage of sap during feeding. The hardened “sheath” remains attached to the plant when the insect is finished feeding.”Unlike a chewing insect, which causes damage by removing plant tissue, stink bugs pierce plant tissue and suck nutrients from the plant,” said Michelle Peiffer, research support assistant. “During this process, stink bugs also deposit saliva onto the plant. The interaction between this saliva and the plant is what causes the cosmetic and physiological changes that make crops unmarketable.”To extract the two types of saliva from brown marmorated stink bugs, Felton and Peiffer first collected adult bugs from homes and fields in central Pennsylvania and maintained them in their laboratory.The researchers chilled the insects on ice. As the insects returned to room temperature, their watery saliva was secreted from the tips of their beaks. …

For more info: Characterization of stink bug saliva proteins opens door to controlling pests

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Characterization of stink bug saliva proteins opens door to controlling pests

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