Building Company Fined after Work Accident Injury

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 7 » Building Company Fined after Work Accident InjuryBuilding Company Fined after Work Accident InjuryA building company and the director of a roofing firm have been ordered to pay sizeable fines following a workplace accident that led to an employee suffering serious injuries.In 2012, a self-employed roofer had been under the control of John Donald of John Donald Roofing, which had been sub-contracted to carry out work on a building project by Right Angle Ltd.During work on a project in which three residential properties were being refurbished and extended, the unnamed worker was at one point clearing materials from a flat roof.He saw a piece of ply board that he thought was debris so he picked it up. However, the board was actually concealing a roof light void. The man, who was aged 28 at the time of the accident, ended up falling from a height of 5.6 metres.Multiple bones in his back were fractured and broken during the fall, while his thigh, lungs and diaphragm were bruised.The extent of the employee’s injuries meant he could not return to work for more than a year, and he has been left with a persistent back problem that requires treatment in hospital. This means he has had to seek employment elsewhere.HSE Work Accident InvestigationA work accident investigation launched by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) after the accident and a number of failings were identified at the building site.The HSE criticised John Donald and Right Angle Ltd for failing to take adequate steps to mark and protect voids in the roof.HSE Inspectors described the measures that had been in place as “totally unacceptable” and warned that many workers on the site could have experienced a similar accident. The HSE also identified a number of other shortcomings on the site, including open staircases without handrails and a lack of edge protection on scaffolding.In addition, excess rubbish and debris on the building site was said to have created numerous slip and trip hazards, while there were various fire risks with insufficient prevention measures in place.The HSE concluded that the defendants had not properly planned, managed or monitored the work, which meant that the accident had been completely avoidable.Right Angle Ltd pleaded guilty to breaching the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 and was handed a £15,000 fine in a hearing at Westminster Magistrates’ Court. The company was also ordered to pay £5,375 in costs.In addition, John Donald admitted breaching the Work at Height Regulations 2005 and was fined £4,000, plus costs of £3,695.Danielle Coppell, an inspector at the HSE, commented, “There were numerous failings on the part of Right Angle Ltd that exposed multiple operatives to a host of foreseeable risks, including falls, slips and trips.”John Donald has to accept culpability as an experienced roofer who should have known better. He instructed the injured worker to work in an unsafe area where there were wholly insufficient measures in place to prevent or mitigate a fall.”Ms Coppell added that the consequence of their shortcomings is that a young man has been left with life-changing spinal injuries, from which he might never completely recover.By Francesca WitneyOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

I am off to Canberra as a keynote/guest speaker to talk with our Politicians

Next Monday 14 July 2014 PGARD (Parliamentary Group on Asbestos Related Diseases) have organised a luncheon at Parliament House, Canberra for various party politicians to be present. Also ASEA (Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency) are also supporting this important event to raising awareness about the dangers of asbestos. I have been invited to be a keynote/guest speaker. It is an honour to have been asked and I am looking forward to this event.I will be flying up on Sunday afternoon and staying with good friends for the night rather than an early flight on the Monday morning that could leave me feeling exhausted and a bit short of breath.Our winter weather has well and truly set in today. We were lucky to get above 4 degrees celcius. …

Read more

Adult tonsillectomy complications and health care expenses

A study released today of 36,210 adult tonsillectomy patients finds that 20 percent will have a complication, offering valuable new insights to a decades long discussion. The study, featured in the April 2014 issue of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, examines the prevalence of complications in adult tonsillectomies and the impact on health care expenditures.”Researchers have been examining variation in tonsillectomy for years,” explained corresponding author, Dennis Scanlon, PhD. “Yet most research has been documented in pediatric populations. Much less is known about the safety and risks to adult patients that undergo the procedure.”The study is the first of its kind to examine a large adult population, across institutions and provider practices. Data for the study came from MarketScan, a large insurance database of patients with employer-sponsored insurance who had an outpatient tonsillectomy between 2002 and 2007. Previous studies have focused on small numbers of patients within particular institutions and have not considered a wider spectrum of complications beyond post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage. The findings suggest that of the 20 percent who will have a complication, 10 percent will visit an emergency room, and approximately 1.5 percent will be admitted to a hospital within 14 days of the procedure. Six percent were treated for postoperative hemorrhage, 2 percent for dehydration, and 11 percent for ear, nose or throat pain within 14 days of surgery. These estimated complication rates are significantly higher than those reported in prior studies.The study results highlight the challenges patients face when making informed decisions about medical and surgical treatments, as well as the excess costs and harm incurred due to complications. On average, the amount paid for a tonsillectomy without complication was $3,832 whereas tonsillectomy with hemorrhage resulted in an average expenditure of $6,388.”Patients expect to compare the risks and benefits of treatment options, but as our study shows, credible patient centered information is often lacking, even for a common procedure that has been in practice for many, many years. …

Read more

Cable Strike Leads to Fines

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 3 » Cable Strike Leads to FinesCable Strike Leads to FinesTwo firms based in the North East of England have been fined by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) after workers were put at risk of electrocution.Chester-le-Street company Northern Construction Solutions and its Hexham-based counterpart Egger UK were taken to Court by the authority after failings were found in the management of groundworks by inspectors.Cable strikeNewcastle Magistrates’ Court was told that the cable strike took place as work was being undertaken at Egger’s site by Northern Construction Solutions.Staff members were asked to excavate an area in front of a newly built electrical substation in order to install a drainage system that would prevent power outages in the future if there was heavy rain or flooding from nearby rivers.To complete this task they used a digger, but as the bucket of the vehicle came into contact with the ground after a brief period of excavation, it touched onto a 20 kV underground electrical cable, something with enough power to easily kill any human in close proximity.Injury avoidedLuckily, workers were not electrocuted, despite the metal digger touching the live cable.The accident was recorded and passed on to the HSE, which sought to discover why staff members of Northern Construction Solutions were allowed to be in such close proximity to dangerous cables.It was concluded that it was Egger’s duty to provide Northern Construction Solutions with information regarding the location of electric cables.But while Egger gave the contractor an out-of-date diagram without the live wires in place, something that goes against health and safety law, Northern Construction Solutions knew this was the case and did not inform workers.FinesFor its part in the avoidable accident, which the HSE said could have led to multiple deaths, Egger was fined £8,000 and ordered to pay £578.90 in costs after pleading guilty to breaching regulation 22(1)(a) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007.Northern Construction Solutions was also sanctioned and told to pay a combined £4,761.60 in costs and fines after pleading guilty to breaching regulation 13(2) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007.”Fatal consequences”Even though nobody was injured in this case, the HSE has been quick to condemn both companies involved for putting their workers at risk of harm through a lack of record-keeping and poor communication.HSE Inspector Andrea Robbins said, “Fortunately nobody was hurt in this incident. However, the potential for serious, even fatal, injuries was foreseeable.”Had both Egger and Northern Construction Solutions adequately planned and managed the risks arising from contact with live underground cables before the excavation work started, e.g. isolation of the services, provision of up-to-date and accurate information on the location of the underground services, then this incident would have most probably been avoided.”The construction industry needs to be more aware of the dangers of working in the vicinity of live underground services. Appropriate planning and control measures should always be in place.”By Francesca WitneyOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

Arm Injury Accident at Work Leads to Fine

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 3 » Arm Injury Accident at Work Leads to FineArm Injury Accident at Work Leads to FineCEP Ceilings has been hit with a hefty fine following an accident in which an employee’s arm was injured after getting caught in a machine.The worker was operating a amchine at its premises in Stafford last year when his forearm got trapped in its intermeshing metal gears. He subsequently had to undergo skin grafts in order for the wounds to heal.Inspectors from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that the accident came about partly because CEP Ceilings failed to carry out an adequate risk assessment on the site.The HSE also discovered that the company had not implemented a safe system of work, while employees were not monitored sufficiently when they were using machinery.£24,000 FineCEP Ceilings later pleaded guilty to breaching the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 at Stafford Magistrates’ Court. The company was ordered to pay a £24,000 fine plus £1,194 in costs.Unsafe Methods ‘Existed for Many Years’After the sentence was issued in court, the HSE criticised CEP Ceilings for having adopted an unsafe way of working for a long time.Wayne Owen, an inspector at the watchdog, said procedures that had not been fit for purpose had “existed for many years” and this led to the employee suffering a “painful injury”.”CEP Ceilings [failed] to effectively assess the risk to employees from using and clearing the machine and then prescribe a system of work which kept employees safe,” he commented.”Workers were left to determine their own methods of cleaning machinery.”Mr Owen insisted that employers must implement safe working procedures and ensure members of staff are properly instructed and trained on how to comply with these rules in full.This, he said, can help to manage risks during both production and maintenance activities at premises where industrial machinery is in use.”A robust system to monitor employees also needs to be in place to detect any poor practices,” Mr Owen commented.Related Work Accident in StaffordshireThe case follows another work accident in which Andrew Thomas, an employee at Marling Leek in Staffordshire, also suffered an arm injury after it got caught in an unguarded machine.Mr Thomas subsequently had to undergo five operations, but was left with permanent scars, while the strength and feeling in his arm has been reduced as a result of nerve damage and muscle loss.The HSE was particularly critical of Marling Leek as it had been prosecuted over a previous accident in the past, but had failed to address the problems and carry out an adequate risk assessment throughout the business.Lyn Spooner, an inspector at the HSE, insisted that carrying out a risk assessment is a “vital process to allow a company to identify significant risk and ensure it is complying with relevant statutory provisions”.She added that there is extensive guidance on preventing access to dangerous machine parts in the workplace to enable employers to comply with the law.By Chris StevensonOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

Coating Firm Fined After Worker Seriously Damages Hand

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 3 » Coating Firm Fined After Worker Seriously Damages HandCoating Firm Fined After Worker Seriously Damages HandDT Powder Coating, a Bedfordshire-based business, has been handed a large fine following an episode that saw an unnamed employee suffer serious injuries to his right hand.What happened?In September 2012, at the company’s Leighton Buzzard site, the worker was struck by a metal basket and cradle which fell on him after an eyebolt attached to a crane failed, leading the objects to be launched into a degreasing tank.Injuries sustainedThe heavy metal cradle struck the employee’s right hand, leading to serious lacerations, several bones being broken and damage to his nerves and tendons.Since sustaining his injuries, the employee found himself unable to work for over a year.HSE investigationThe first failing by DT Powder Coating was that it did not report the accident within the required 15-day period.However, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) was eventually called in to investigate the event and identified a number of areas in which the company had failed to prevent such accidents from taking place.The HSE investigation into the case revealed employees had been concerned about the health and safety practices carried out by DT Powder Coating for some time.Speaking after the Court case, HSE inspector Emma Rowlands said, “We received several complaints from current and previous employees regarding this company.”These three employee concerns led to four improvement notices being served to DT Powder Coating by the HSE.During the inquiry, it was found that employees had not been properly trained on how to lift equipment safely and there was no system in place to ensure such tasks were carried out in the correct manner.The HSE noted the faulty eyebolt needed to have been screwed into the basket’s framework much more securely, as its looseness appeared to be the primary cause of the accident.Ms Rowlands said, “Our investigation revealed a lack of basic employee training and that lifting operations were carried out in a way that exposed employees to risk of injury. In this case, an employee suffered a needless injury, which has prevented him from working for over a year.”OutcomeEarlier this week, Luton Magistrates’ Court ruled that DT Powder Coating was guilty of breaching Regulation 2 of the 1974 Health and Safety at Work Act and Regulation 3 of the 1995 Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, as well as Regulation 5 of the 1998 Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations.The first of these breaches relates to the company failing to ensure the welfare of its workers, while the second is because the firm did not report the accident within the correct period of time. The third and final breach relates to the business’ failure to maintain its machinery properly and keep records of any repairs needed or how long it has been since they were last carried out.For these safety failings, the firm was ordered by the Court to pay a fine of £36,000 plus an additional £10,509 in legal costs.By Francesca WitneyOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

Inherited Alzheimer’s damage greater decades before symptoms appear

The progression of Alzheimer’s may slow once symptoms appear and do significant damage , according to a study investigating an inherited form of the disease.In a paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, Professor Colin Masters from the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health and University of Melbourne — and colleagues in the UK and US — have found rapid neuronal damage begins 10 to 20 years before symptoms appear.”As part of this research we have observed other changes in the brain that occur when symptoms begin to appear. There is actually a slowing of the neurodegeneration,” said Professor Masters. Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer’s affects families with a genetic mutation, predisposing them to the crippling disease. These families provide crucial insight into the development of Alzheimer’s because they can be identified years before symptoms develop. The information gleaned from this group will also influence treatment offered to those living with the more common age-related version. Only about one per cent of those with Alzheimer’s have the genetic type of the disease.The next part of the study involves a clinical trial. Using a range of imaging techniques (MRI and PET) and analysis of blood and cerebrospinal fluid, individuals from the US, UK and Australia will be observed as they trial new drugs to test their safety, side effects and changes within the brain.”As part of an international study, family members are invited to be part of a trial in which two experimental drugs are offered many years before symptoms appear,” Prof Masters says. “It’s going to be very interesting to see how clinical intervention affects this group of patients in the decades before symptoms appear.”Story Source:The above story is based on materials provided by University of Melbourne. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Read more

Window Cleaners Fined Over Compensation Failings

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 2 » Window Cleaners Fined Over Compensation FailingsWindow Cleaners Fined Over Compensation FailingsJason Mawson, the boss of a County Durham window cleaning company, has been fined by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) over compensation insurance failings.Darlington Magistrates’ Court was told that Mr Dawson operated a window cleaning company that traded as We-aredale Cleaning and offered local residents their services on a door-to-door basis.Part of his role as an employer required him to hold insurance against injury or disease liability.This would enable his workers to claim compensation for any industrial accident that took place, but his failure to have cover in place left his workers at risk.An inspector from the HSE asked Mr Mawson to produce his insurance certificate a number of times, but he repeatedly failed to do so, even when presented with a formal notice in September 2013.For failing to have adequate compensation cover in place, Mr Mawson was fined £100 and told to pay £755 in costs after he pleaded guilty to breaching the Employers’ Liability (Compulsory Insurance) Act 1969.This statute dictates that employers must, at all times, have a relevant insurance policy in place to allow staff to claim redress in the event of an accident.”As well as being a legal requirement, Employers’ Liability Compulsory Insurance offers important protection for employers and employees alike,” HSE inspector Victoria Wise said.”Without it, if a worker becomes ill or is injured at work, they will not be able to claim compensation from the employer. For employers, insurance covers the cost of legal fees and compensation payouts in the event of a claim by a worker.”In 2013-14 some 148 workers in the UK died as a result of injuries at work and thousands more suffered industrial diseases caused by issues their employer was liable for.But despite this, many small businesses neglect their obligation to arrange Employers’ Liability Compulsory Insurance, leaving workers out of pocket and at risk of financial insolvency.By Francesca WitneyOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

Company Fined Over Crush Injuries

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 2 » Company Fined Over Crush InjuriesCompany Fined Over Crush InjuriesBouygues UK, the principal contractor for an extension project at Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford, has been fined by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).The organisation took Bouygues to court over its role in the death of Guilherme de Oliveira, 44, from Portugal, who suffered fatal crush injuries in an accident.Chelmsford Crown Court was told that the 44-year-old was working through an agency as a banksman and was responsible for fixing beams across supporting towers to form the concrete structure of a new building.Mr de Oliveira and another banksman climbed the towers to unhook some lifting chains, but was three metres off the ground when he did this.A concrete beam was then lifted up to the duo, but increasingly fast winds made the job difficult.Before the Portuguese man was able free the heavy object from its hooks, winds blew above safe limits and as a result the crane carrying the block moved in the wind, sending it towards Mr de Oliveira and crushing him against an adjacent wall.He died soon after the accident.After being informed of the case, the HSE launched an investigation and found sensors used to measure wind speeds were not being monitored at the time of the accident and that deteriorating weather conditions were therefore not factored into operations.For its part in Mr de Oliveria’s death, Bouygues UK was fined £175,000 and ordered to pay £80,000 in costs after pleading guilty to breaching Regulation 8 of the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations.Speaking after the hearing, HSE inspector Dominic Elliss said, “Although the judge was not satisfied that the company’s failings were a direct cause for Mr de Oliveira’s death, he said there was a systemic failure where a risk of serious injury was foreseeable.”Lifting operations can be highly hazardous and the appropriate standards are clearly set out in both the regulations and industry guidance.”By Chris StevensonOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

Schoolgirl Injured in Lift Shaft Fall

Home » No Win No Fee » Latest Personal Injury News » 2014 » 2 » Schoolgirl Injured in Lift Shaft FallSchoolgirl Injured in Lift Shaft FallCity of Edinburgh Council has been fined by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) after a school girl fell more than five metres down a lift shaft.Morgan Seaton, who was 15 years old at the time of the accident, sustained three fractured vertebrae, bruising and a sprained wrist after she and three other pupils became stuck in a lift at the Liberton High School.Ms Seaton called the school’s office from her mobile phone and teachers quickly arrived and told the children to remain calm while they awaited rescue.But instead of phoning the emergency services, teachers from the school decided to ask the janitor to fetch a lift key and attempt to free the students themselves.After managing to open the lift’s doors on the first floor, it was found that the bottom third of the cab could be seen through the opening.The doors to the lift were then opened so that teachers could calm the children down, but it was then decided by the teachers that the pupils should be squeezed out of the opening and into the corridor.One boy was helped out of the lift successfully, but when Ms Seaton attempted to follow suit she accidentally fell down the shaft and crashed to the ground five metres below.It was at this point that the emergency services were notified and when firefighters arrived they found the lift had not been isolated and could have resumed moving at any point, with catastrophic consequences.She had to take two weeks off school and spent several months in pain, disrupting her education and social life.For failing to have contingency policies in place and neglecting to train teachers in how to deal with broken lifts, the HSE took the school’s operator City of Edinburgh Council to court.It pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3 of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and was fined £8,000.After the verdict was handed down, HSE inspector Hazel Dobb said, “A 15-year-old girl was seriously injured in an incident that was wholly preventable. As a result she spent several months in pain.”The teachers were well intentioned in their attempts to help, but had they received suitable information and guidance on how to deal with trapped people in lifts they would have called for help and not put pupils at such risk of injury.”By Chris StevensonOr Call freephone 0800 884 0321SHARE THIS

Read more

The Startling Numbers Behind Motorcycle Accidents

Every year, millions of motorcycle drivers ride every day without being involved in an accident. While you can ride your whole life and never be in a motorcycle crash, the reality is that operating a motorcycle is much more dangerous when compared to driving a car.Despite some claims by motorcycle enthusiasts that a skilled and properly trained motorcycle operator is less likely to be injured than the average car driver, driving or riding on a motorcycle is an inherently dangerous activity. Consider the following differences between cars and motorcycles.The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, or NHTSA, reports that out of every 100,000 cars on the road, 13.1 are involved in fatal crashes each year. The NHTSA also reports that out of every 100,000 motorcycles on the road, 72.34 of them are involved in fatal crashes every year. That means that you are more than 5 times as likely to be involved in a fatal crash when driving a motorcycle than when driving a car. For every 100 million miles travelled, cars involved in 1.7 crashes, while motorcycles are involved in 35. If you are involved in a car accident you have a 20 percent chance of being injured or killed. If you’re involved in a motorcycle accident you have an 80 percent chance of being injured or killed. Motorcycle CrashesMotorcycle operators are not only more likely to be involved in an accident, but those accidents also have distinct characteristics that make them more dangerous. They are also more likely to affect specific types of drivers.In crashes involving a motorcycle and another type of vehicle, such as a car or pick-up truck, motorcycle drivers are 26 times more likely to suffer an injury or die as a result of the collision. …

Read more

Clinical opinion published on use of maternal oxygen during labor

When a fetal heartbeat pattern becomes irregular during labor, many practitioners give oxygen to the mother. But questions remain whether this oxygen supplementation benefits the fetus or may actually be potentially harmful.A clinical opinion written by third year resident Maureen Hamel, MD, along with maternal-fetal medicine specialists Brenna Anderson, MD and Dwight Rouse, MD, of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, has been published in the January 10, 2014 online edition of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.The manuscript, entitled “Oxygen for intrauterine resuscitation: Of unproved benefit and potentially harmful,” aimed to make recommendations about the safety of the use of maternal oxygen supplementation in laboring women.According to lead author Dr. Hamel, “Maternal oxygen is often given to laboring women to improve fetal metabolic status or in an attempt to alleviate non-reassuring fetal heart rate patterns. However, there are only two randomized trials investigating the use of maternal oxygen supplementation in laboring women. These studies did not find that supplementation is likely to benefit the fetus and may even be harmful.”Based on their research, the team concludes that until it is studied properly in a randomized clinical trial, maternal oxygen supplementation in labor should be reserved for maternal hypoxia (lack of oxygen) and should not be considered an indicated intervention for non-reassuring fetal status.Story Source:The above story is based on materials provided by Women & Infants Hospital. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Read more

Mobile compression device recommended to prevent DVT after joint surgery

Research from The Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education at Scripps Clinic could change how patients are treated to prevent blood clots after joint replacement surgery. A study published today as the lead article in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery determined that after lower extremity joint replacement surgery a mobile compression device was just as effective as blood thinners in preventing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), but without negative side effects including bleeding complications.The multicenter study, led by Scripps Clinic orthopedic surgeon Clifford Colwell, MD evaluated the efficacy of a mobile compression device that is small and portable enough for patients to use at home for 10 days or longer after joint replacement surgery.”Blood thinners have long been considered the standard of care to prevent blood clots after orthopedic surgery, but they can have side effects that are concerning for many patients,” said Dr. Colwell. “Through this research we have found and established an equally effective means of accomplishing the same goal with an added layer of safety for patients.”Story Source:The above story is based on materials provided by Scripps Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Read more

Large-scale studies to evaluate testosterone therapy risks

According to a statement issued today by the Endocrine Society, the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy for older men with declining levels of the hormone need to be fully evaluated.The statement comes in response to recent studies that have raised concerns about the safety of testosterone therapy in older men with a history of heart disease. Two retrospective analyses and one randomized trial supported by the Veterans Health Care System, and the National Institutes of Health found a higher rate of cardiovascular events in men who received testosterone and had preexisting heart problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced it plans to evaluate the safety of testosterone therapy.Testosterone is approved for the treatment of hypogonadism due to known diseases of the testes, pituitary and hypothalamus. Although the use of testosterone therapy is increasing, the treatment has not been approved for the treatment of age-related symptoms or the age-related decline of testosterone levels.Important safety data are expected from the NIA’s ongoing randomized trial examining testosterone in about 800 older men with unequivocally low testosterone levels and accompanying symptoms, including sexual and physical dysfunction. The trial’s structure and careful monitoring of cardiovascular events will help provide important safety information.The Society calls for the development of more large-scale randomized controlled trials to determine the true risks and benefits of testosterone therapy in older men.In the statement, the Society recommends that middle-aged and older men who are considering testosterone supplementation for age-related declines should be informed of the potential cardiovascular risks. The Society also believes that it may be prudent not to administer testosterone therapy to men who have had a cardiovascular event (such as myocardial infarction, stroke or acute coronary syndrome) in the preceding six months.In cases where men are being treated for hypogonadism as a result of known diseases of the testes, pituitary and hypothalamus, however, patients should consult their health care providers before making any changes to their medication regimen. The Society believes testosterone is generally safe and beneficial when used to treat young, hypogonadal men with these conditions.Story Source:The above story is based on materials provided by The Endocrine Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Read more

Knowing What Causes Motorcycle Accidents Could Save Your Life

Whether you are an experienced rider or are considering your first motorcycle, educating yourself about motorcycle safety is a must. Generally speaking, motorcycles are significantly more dangerous than passenger cars and light trucks. Consider the following statistics:According to the Department of Transportation, motorcycle operators are involved in deadly accidents 35 times more than those driving cars or trucks. More than half of motorcycle crashes resulting in a fatality involved at least one other vehicle. The remaining crashes did not involve other vehicles, but instead involved encounters with obstructed roadways, collisions with fixed objects, or other dangers. Of those motorcycle operators who died in a crash, about half were speeding while just over 40% had blood-alcohol concentrations above the legal limit. Common Crash CausesWhile motorcycle accidents statistics are sobering, the story doesn’t end there. Motorcycles lack many of the safety features that cars and light trucks have. In addition to having open cabins and no seat belts or driver restraints, motorcycles are also significantly smaller than other vehicles. Their size is a significant safety factor because other drivers often fail to see them on the road. …

Read more

Workers Memorial Day–Remember the Dead, Fight for the Living

In recognition of Workers Memorial Day 2013,Worthington & Caronwould like to acknowledge all of the working men and women who have been hurt, taken ill or have died in pursuit of their piece of the “American Dream”. This, of course, includes hundreds of thousands of workers who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, lung cancer or asbestosis as a result of exposure to asbestos in the workplace.The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established on April 28, 1971 with the mission of assuring safe and healthful working conditions by setting and enforcing standards and providing training, outreach, education and assistance. The anniversary of this day has been designated Worker’s Memorial Day, a day to honor all men and women who have been injured or have lost their lives …

Read more

Sustaining Injuries on Construction Sites

Work in the construction industry is physically demanding and incredibly dangerous. Varied terrain, unpredictable weather, and ever-changing surroundings are a few of the many factors that can predispose to a construction-related injury. Falls from scaffolding or ladders, injury from falling debris, machinery accidents, and electrocution are all examples of what can happen when something goes wrong on a construction site, either as a result of an accident or due to negligence.It goes without saying that the injuries in the construction industry can be severe. Sprains, strains, broken bones, and even death can occur. When occupational injuries and illnesses are reported, one of the key measures of injury severity is the median number of days spent away from work per each injured case. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2011, the construction industry ranked third, with a median number of 14 days spent away from work due to injury. Only the mining and transportation industries ranked higher.In addition, for many years, construction workers have experienced the highest number of fatal occupational injuries among workers in all industries. Despite a 42% decline in the number of fatal injuries in the industry since 2006, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the private construction industry had the highest number of job-related fatalities in 2010, with a total of 774 deaths reported.It is possible that these numbers do not accurately represent the full scope of fatal accidents that occur in the construction industry. For example, many experts believe that the 42% decline in construction-related deaths is likely due to adverse economic conditions that have lowered recent demand for the services of the construction industry. In addition, a recent report from the Center for Construction Research and Training noted that the data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not include self-employed or federal workers, who comprise roughly 25% of the U.S. …

Read more

Cruise Ship Injuries – Sources and Concerns

Taking a vacation on a cruise ship is a popular choice for many Americans and their families. Cruise ships offer exotic destinations, the promise of wonderful food, and a family-friendly environment that many find irresistible. How irresistible? Just look at some of the numbers. The worldwide cruising industry is incredibly large, with an estimated income of $40 billion in 2010 alone. Almost 15,000,000 Americans take a cruise every year, and each person spends an average of seven days aboard ship, spending an average of $1,800 per passenger. That means a family of four can expect to spend over $7,000 on an average cruise.Yet as popular as cruising is, there are potential downsides. Though major accidents and disasters are rare, they do happen. One of the most recent occurred in January of 2012 when the Costa Concordia sank off of Italy, resulting in the death of 32 people. But the big disasters are very rare. …

Read more

9 DUI Fatalities over Labor Day in Colorado

Photo via CDOT Back in January, Harmony Foundation wrote a blog about the number of impaired driving arrests over the New Year. We hoped that that news of arrests would’ve served as a deterrent throughout the state, but it seems numbers were even higher during the recent Labor Day enforcement period between August 16th and September 3rd.During this time period, known to be a heavy party time as people say goodbye to summer, there were a total of 1,342 arrests and 9 impaired driving related deaths. This was reported by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and the Colorado State Police who have joined together to create a campaign called The Heat is On to crackdown on drunk driving.According to the Director of the Office of Transportation…

Read more

Utilizzando il sito, accetti l'utilizzo dei cookie da parte nostra. maggiori informazioni

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close