Brawn matters: Stronger adolescents, teens have less risk of diabetes, heart disease

Adolescents with stronger muscles have a lower risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to a new study that examined the influence of muscle strength in sixth grade boys and girls.Stronger kids also have lower body mass index (weight to height ratio), lower percent body fat, smaller waist circumferences, and higher fitness levels, according to the study that appears in Pediatrics.Researchers analyzed health data for more than 1,400 children ages 10 to 12, including their percent body fat, glucose level, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and triglycerides (a type of fat, or lipid, which may increase risk of heart disease). Those with greater strength-to-body-mass ratios — or pound-for-pound strength capacities — had significantly lower risks of heart disease and diabetes.”It’s a widely-held belief that BMI, sedentary behaviors and low cardiovascular fitness levels are linked to diabetes, heart disease and stroke, but our findings suggest muscle strength possibly may play an equally important role in cardiometabolic health in children,” says lead author Mark D. Peterson, Ph.D, M.S., research assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Michigan Medical School.The study’s corresponding author was Paul M. Gordon, Ph.D., M.P.H, who is a Professor at Baylor University in Texas. Gordon suggests that strengthening activities may be equally important to physical activity participation.The research is based on data from the Cardiovascular Health Intervention Program (CHIP), a study of sixth graders from 17 mid-area Michigan schools between 2005 and 2008.Participants were tested for strength capacity using a standardized handgrip strength assessment, which is recently recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Researchers also measured cardiorespiratory fitness — how well the body is able to transport oxygen to muscles during prolonged exercise, and how well muscles are able to absorb and use it.The study is believed to be the first to show a robust link between strength capacity and a lower chance of having diabetes, heart disease or stroke (cardiometabolic risk) in adolescents, even after controlling for the influence of BMI, physical activity participation, and cardiorespiratory fitness.”The stronger you are relative to your body mass, the healthier you are,” Peterson says. “Exercise, sports, and even recreational activity that supports early muscular strength acquisition, should complement traditional weight loss interventions among children and teens in order to reduce risks of serious diseases throughout adolescence.”Previous, large-scale studies have found low muscular strength in teen boys is a risk factor for several major causes of death in young adulthood, such as suicide and cardiovascular diseases.Story Source:The above story is based on materials provided by University of Michigan Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Obesity, depression linked in teen girls, new study shows

Depression and obesity have long been associated, but how they relate over time is less clear. New research from a Rutgers University-Camden professor shows that adolescent females who experience one of the disorders are at a greater risk for the other as they get older.”Adolescence is a key developmental period for both obesity and depression, so we thought it significant to look at the onset of these disorders at an early age,” says Naomi Marmorstein, an associate professor of psychology at Rutgers-Camden.By assessing a statewide sample of more than 1,500 males and females in Minnesota over a period of more than 10 years, Marmorstein and two colleagues found that depression occurring by early adolescence in females predicts obesity by late adolescence.Meanwhile, obesity that occurs by late adolescence in females predicts the onset of depression by early adulthood. No significant associations between the two disorders across time were found in males during the study.Marmorstein’s article, “Obesity and depression in adolescence and beyond: reciprocal risks,” was recently published in the International Journal of Obesity. She co-authored the study with University of Minnesota psychology professor William Iacono and research associate Lisa Legrand.”When researchers looked at this connection over time, data had been mixed,” Marmorstein says. “Some found that depression and obesity go hand-in-hand, while others did not see that connection. We tried to take the next step in clarifying this link by looking at a sample of youth that we followed from ages 11 to 24.”This method improves on past research that included recurrence or persistence of depression and obesity rather than focusing on the onset of each disorder. Participants in Marmorstein’s study were assessed at ages 11, 14, 17, 20, and 24 by using height and weight measurements and clinical, interview-based diagnosis of major depressive disorder. The researchers looked specifically for onsets of either disorder by age 14, between the ages of 14 and 20, and between ages 20 and 24.Marmorstein emphasizes that this study was not designed to investigate the reasons for these associations, but other theories and research speaks to possible explanations. She says depression can lead to obesity through an increased appetite, poor sleep patterns, and lethargy, while obesity can cause depression due to weight stigma, poor self-esteem, and reduced mobility.”When a person is young, she is still developing eating and activity patterns, as well as coping mechanisms,” Marmorstein explains. “So if she experiences a depressive episode at age 14, she may be more at risk for having an onset of unhealthy patterns that persist.”The Rutgers-Camden scholar says a child who is obese may be more susceptible to negative societal messages about obesity or teasing, which could contribute to depression.”At this age, adolescents are starting to establish relationships becoming self-conscious, so teasing can be particularly painful,” Marmorstein says.She says prevention efforts aimed at both of these disorders at the same time when one of them is diagnosed in adolescents might help in decreasing their prevalence and comorbidity.”When an adolescent girl receives treatment for depression, the clinician might consider incorporating something relating to healthy eating and activity,” she says. …

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Butt Exercises: Triangle Oblique

How to FitnessButt Exercises: Triangle ObliqueWhat do you really want: toned legs or rock-hard abs? With this move from Brooke Burke-Charvet, you don’t have to choose! Watch the video to learn how to do this exercise which combines a leg lift with a powerful oblique crunch.Brooke Burke-Charvet’s next workout moveSee the full workout #abs&core #legs&butt

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Hormone released after exercise can ‘predict’ biological age

Scientists from Aston University (UK) have discovered a potential molecular link between Irisin, a recently identified hormone released from muscle after bouts of exercise, and the aging process.Irisin, which is naturally present in humans, is capable of reprograming the body’s fat cells to burn energy instead of storing it. This increases the metabolic rate and is thought to have potential anti-obesity effects.The research team led by Dr James Brown have proven a significant link exists between Irisin levels in the blood and a biological marker of aging called telomere length. Telomeres are small regions found at the end of chromosomes that shorten as cells within the body replicate. Short telomere length has been linked to many age-related diseases including cancer, heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.Using a population of healthy, non-obese individuals, the team has shown those individuals who had higher levels of Irisin were found to have longer telomeres. The finding provides a potential molecular link between keeping active and healthy aging with those having higher Irisin levels more ‘biological young’ than those with lower levels of the hormone.Dr James Brown from Aston’s Research Centre for Healthy Ageing, said: “Exercise is known to have wide ranging benefits, from cardiovascular protection to weight loss. Recent research has suggested that exercise can protect people from both physical and mental decline with aging. Our latest findings now provide a potential molecular link between keeping active and a healthy aging process.”Irisin itself is secreted from muscle in response to exercise and is capable of reprograming the body’s fat cells to burn energy instead of storing it. This increases the metabolic rate and is thought to have potential weight loss effects, which in turn could help with conditions such as type-2 diabetes.Story Source:The above story is based on materials provided by Aston University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Breast cancer survivors reap benefits of weight training, study finds

Tallahassee resident Jennie Simons couldn’t even reach over her head by the time she had finished her breast cancer treatment in 2008. She was a survivor, beating back a particularly aggressive case of breast cancer — first in 2000 and then again in 2008 when it recurred — but the chemotherapy left her body ravaged.She had 15 surgeries during the breast reconstruction process, plus additional surgeries on her spine and arms because the chemo had weakened her bones so much that they started chipping away.”I couldn’t reach over my head,” said Simons, 63. “I couldn’t reach my back to bathe it.”So, in 2010 when she heard about a new study at Florida State University that was working with postmenopausal breast cancer survivors by putting them on a weight training regime, she signed up.Said Simons: “At the end of six months, I was lifting a lot of weights. It helped me mentally and physically.”Through that study, researchers at Florida State University and other institutions found that if you put female breast cancer survivors on a weight training program and fed them prunes, they could at least maintain their current levels of muscle mass and bone density. The findings were published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism.”If we can prevent that decrease, that’s a step in the right direction, ” said Lynn Panton, associate professor of exercise science and a co-author of the study.Now, Panton and one of her doctoral students, Titch Madzima, are following up on that research, recruiting another group of women to participate in a study that involves personal training with Madzima and other graduate students twice per week, followed by consumption of a vanilla bean-flavored protein drink.Simons signed up again. So for the next three months, Madzima is taking her through leg presses, bicep curls, leg extensions and other exercises in a small laboratory on the FSU campus that is outfitted with a small gym. It’s a total body workout.Panton and Madzima are trying to find out if they tweak the approach from the first study if they can eventually reverse the effects of the chemotherapy and help women gain back some lost muscle mass and bone density.”If we can slow down that accelerated loss or reverse that process, hopefully we’ll improve the quality of life of the breast cancer survivor,” Madzima said.And while the ultimate goal is to find a solid program for breast cancer survivors to follow on a larger scale, the university researchers are also helping local women through the process of recovery.”Working with the ladies is amazing,” Panton said. “We almost become a family. We’ve done a number of parties, a potluck.”Study participant Nancy Van Wilder, who was diagnosed in 2009 right after her 50th birthday, said that cancer was a “kick in the butt” and having a support group from women who have gone through the same treatment and ultimate recovery is essential.Van Wilder said she participated in the original study in 2010 to get back into shape so she could run a 5K for breast cancer research. She wound up running nine races that year.Working out alongside the other women, plus Panton and her graduate students was key to that, she said. …

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Avoid gym intimidation: A guide to a beginner gym session

Learn more about Herbalife – Follow @Herbalife on Twitter- Like Herbalife on Facebook- What is Herbalife? More fitness advice – Watch ‘Fit Tips’ Videos on YouTube- Straightforward exercise advice- Get fit = be happy. Positivity advice Nutrition advice for you – Watch ‘Healthy Living’ on YouTube- Dieting advice you might like- Interesting weight loss articles Copyright © 2013 Herbalife International of America, Inc.

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CONTENT REMOVED

by Dan StoriesA few years ago I was in a dead end job and I was looking for a change.I set out to search, network, and if I had to, bribe (I was desperate..) my way into a new situation. I struck gold when I had coffee with a guy named Jim Grafas.After one or two more of these caffeine rendezvous, things were looking up. It seemed I had a new job and a new friend. Little did I know I was about to witness him go through one of the most incredible transformations I’ve ever seen.After a turning point moment Jim decided to change his life for the better and as a result he’s lost 88 pounds (40 kgs) and most importantly, kept …

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Reward with Music

Cardio Workouts Lose Weight Get Stronger Yoga & Pilates Recipes Must-Eat Foods Celebrity Chefs Myths & Facts Skin & Anti-Aging Hair & Makeup Slimming Style Celebrity Tips Adult ADHD Alzheimer’s Disease Asthma Bipolar Disorder Birth Control Breast Cancer Childhood Vaccines Cholesterol Chronic Pain Cold, Flu, and Sinus COPD Crohn’s Disease Depression Diabetes (Type 2) Fibromyalgia GERD Headaches & Migraines Incontinence Menopause Multiple Sclerosis Osteoarthritis Osteoporosis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Sexual Health Sleep Disorders More Conditions Current Issue Subscribe Tablet Edition Archive Give a Gift Subscription Customer Service Media Kit Home>>Diet & Fitness>>Cardio Workouts>> Reward with MusicHealth TipsReward with MusicGet healthier now with our expert advice.How to Become an Exercise Addict 30-Minute Workout, No Gym Required 18 Moves to Tone Your Legs…

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How to stay in shape with the perfect workout

Learn more about Herbalife – Follow @Herbalife on Twitter- Like Herbalife on Facebook- What is Herbalife? More fitness advice – Watch Fit Tips Videos on YouTube- Straightforward exercise advice- Get fit = be happy. Positivity advice Nutrition advice for you – Watch Healthy Living on YouTube- Dieting advice you might like- Interesting weight loss articles Copyright © 2013 Herbalife International of America, Inc.

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Housework isn’t as healthy as people think

Oct. 17, 2013 — Claiming housework as exercise may be a mistake finds research in BioMed Central’s open access journal BMC Public Health. For the same amount of time people who included housework in their self recorded moderate to vigorous physical activity tended to be heavier than those whose time was spent in other forms of exercise.Share This:The UK Department of Health recommends 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week. When questioned about their activity levels only 43% of the population reported meeting or exceeding these guidelines, and two thirds of these people included at least 10 minutes of housework in their weekly tally.This analysis of data, from the Sport NI Sport & Physical Activity Survey (SAPAS) by the University of Ulster, showed that people who included housework as part of their weekly exercise tended to be heavier. Prof Marie Murphy who led this study commented, “Housework is physical activity and any physical activity should theoretically increase the amount of calories expended. But we found that housework was inversely related to leanness which suggests that either people are overestimating the amount of moderate intensity physical activity they do through housework, or are eating too much to compensate for the amount of activity undertaken.”Women and older people included higher levels of housework. For women, exclusion of housework from the list of activities meant that only 20% met current activity recommendations. Prof Murphy continued, “When talking to people about the amount of physical activity they need to stay healthy, it needs to be made clear that housework may not be intense enough to contribute to the weekly target and that other more intense activities also need to be included each week.”Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central Limited. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. …

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Participation in cardiac rehab program improves recovery in stroke patients

Oct. 16, 2013 — Stroke patients who participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program for six months make rapid gains in how far and fast they can walk, the use of weakened limbs and their ability to sit and stand, according to a study presented today at the Canadian Stroke Congress.On average, participants saw a 21-per-cent improvement in the strength and range of motion of weakened limbs; a 19-per-cent improvement in walking speed; and a 16-per-cent improvement in the distance they could walk.”There should be a seamless referral of patients with mild to moderate effects of stroke to the network of established outpatient cardiac rehab programs in Canada,” says lead researcher Dr. Susan Marzolini of Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network. “Early referral is also important. In our study, those who started the cardiac rehab program earlier had the strongest results.”Cardiac rehabilitation incorporates exercise training (aerobic and resistance/strength training), nutrition counseling, risk factor counseling and management (lipids, blood pressure, diabetes, weight management, smoking cessation and psychosocial management,) delivered by an interprofessional health care team.All of the 120 patients who participated in the study saw improved recovery.The largest gains in walking function were among those who were referred to the program the earliest. Participants were, on average, two years post-stroke but the study included people who had experienced a stroke from three months to five years previously.In most cases, rehabilitation ends at three months post-stroke, when it has been assumed that spontaneous recovery is over and people reach a plateau, Dr. Marzolini says.For those who entered the six-month cardiac rehab program after standard care, “we didn’t see a plateau, we saw a huge improvement in the group. We’re finding even more benefits from exercise alone than we ever thought.””We have manufactured these three-month plateaus with our biases about how the brain works,” says Dr. Dale Corbett, Scientific Director of the Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery (CPSR), a joint initiative of the Heart and Stroke Foundation and Canada’s leading stroke research centres, which funded the study. “Recovery continues for months and years after stroke.”A 2011 audit of stroke services in Canada found that only 37 per cent of stroke patients with moderate to severe impairments receive standard rehabilitation in the weeks after stroke, despite overwhelming evidence of its benefits.”The results of this study are exciting because this exercise program is a very cost-effective intervention for improving the quality of life for those living with the effects of stroke,” says Canadian Stroke Congress Co-Chair Dr. …

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CONTENT REMOVED

Growing up I was not much of a sporty kid.Sure, I’d tried the buffet strategy, “I’ll try a little bit of this and a little bit of that.”, But I never quite settled on something I enjoyed.After getting concussed during Rugby, I decided that was too rough. I tried playing cricket, but then I realized I didn’t enjoy standing in the sun mostly doing nothing all day. I looked into underwater hockey, but then I realized the boys had to wear speedos and so I vetoed that too. While all my “jock” buddies were out getting abs, tans, and ladies I was in the music room playing punk music. Despite my fingers getting a workout on the guitar fret board, the only physical change …

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Exercise provides some benefits for depression

Sep. 11, 2013 — Exercise may benefit people suffering from depression, according to an updated systematic review published in The Cochrane Library. The authors of the review found evidence to suggest that exercise reduces symptoms of depression, although they say more high quality trials are needed.Worldwide, more than 120 million people suffer from depression. Antidepressants and psychological therapies are recommended as effective treatments for depression. However, antidepressants have side-effects and some people prefer not to receive, or may not have access to, psychological therapies. Physical exercise is also used as a treatment for depression. There are a number of reasons why it might work such as changing hormone levels that affect mood or providing a distraction from negative thoughts.The previous version of the Cochrane review found only limited evidence of benefit for exercise in depression. However, more trials have now been completed, leading researchers to carry out a further update. Altogether, they reviewed the results of 39 trials involving 2,326 people diagnosed with depression. The severity of patients’ symptoms was assessed using standard scales of depression.In 35 trials comparing exercise with control treatments or no treatment, the researchers saw moderate benefits of exercise for treating depression. …

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Irregular periods in young women can be cause for concern

Sep. 10, 2013 — While irregular periods are common among teenage girls, an underlying hormonal disorder may be to blame if this problem persists.Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder that is characterized by an excess of androgens or male hormones in the body. The imbalance of hormones interferes with the growth and release of eggs from the ovaries, which can prevent ovulation and menstruation.Menstruation begins on average at age 12, and a normal menstrual cycle is approximately 28 days. Dr. Kavic reports that girls should have a regular menstrual cycle within approximately two years after they get their first period or by age 17 at the latest.”PCOS can be overlooked because irregular periods are normal in teens,” said Suzanne Kavic, MD, division director, Reproductive Endocrinology, Loyola University Health System (LUHS). “However, if erratic menstrual cycles persist later into the teen years, girls should see a specialist to determine if something else might be causing this issue.”Other symptoms associated with PCOS can include weight gain, hair growth on the body and face, thinning of the hair on the head, acne and infertility. Women with PCOS are at risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol and endometrial cancer. People with PCOS also tend to become resistant to insulin, which can lead to diabetes.”Symptoms associated with this syndrome can be concerning to young girls particularly during the teen years, which is already a stressful time,” Dr. Kavic said. “The good news is we can identify PCOS at an early age and begin managing symptoms to alleviate some of the anxiety for these girls.”Treatments for PCOS can include a combination of exercise, diet modifications and medication. …

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Anterior cruciate ligament injuries may be prevented by different landing strategy

Sep. 3, 2013 — Women are two to eight times more likely than men to suffer a debilitating tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee and a new study suggests that a combination of body type and landing techniques may be to blame.In two new studies published online this week in the Journal of Athletic Training, lead author Marc Norcross of Oregon State University documents how women who were asked to undergo a series of jumping exercises landed more often than men in a way associated with elevated risk of ACL injuries.Both men and women tended to land stiffly, which can lead to ACL injuries, but women were 3.6 times more likely to land in a “knock-kneed” position, which the researchers say may be the critical factor leading to the gender disparity in ACL tears.”We found that both men and women seem to be using their quad region the same, so that couldn’t explain why females are more at risk,” Norcross said. “Using motion analysis, we were able to pinpoint that this inability to control the frontal-plane knee loading — basically stress on the knee from landing in a knock-kneed position — as a factor more common in women.”Future research may isolate why women tend to land this way,” he added, “but it could in part be because of basic biology. Women have wider hips, making it more likely that their knees come together after jumping.”Norcross, an assistant professor of exercise and sport science in OSU’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences, is a former collegiate athletic trainer dedicating his research to the prevention of ACL tears.”You see ACL injuries in any sport where you have a lot of jump stops and cuts, so basketball, soccer, lacrosse, and volleyball are high-risk sports,” said Norcross. “We know that people who hurt themselves tend to look stiff when they land and that the combined ‘knee loading’ from multiple directions is likely causing the injury event. But it wasn’t clear initially why women had more injuries than men.”The researchers used motion analysis software to monitor the landing strategies of 82 physically active men and women. They found that both males and females had an equal likelihood of landing stiffly — likely from tensing the muscles in their quads before landing — putting them at higher risk of ACL tears. Women, however, were more likely to land in a “knee valgus” position, essentially knock-kneed.Norcross said his next research project will focus on high school athletes, looking at a sustainable way to integrate injury prevention into team warm-up activities through improving landing technique.”We are trying to create a prevention strategy that is sustainable and will be widely used by high school coaches,” he said. “A lot of athletes do come back from an ACL injury, but it is a long road. And the real worry is that it leads to early onset arthritis, which then impacts their ability to stay physically active.”This study was supported by the NATA Research & Education Foundation Doctoral Grant Program.

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Doubling the daily allowance of protein intake with diet and exercise protects muscle loss

Aug. 29, 2013 — A new report appearing in the September issue of The FASEB Journal challenges the long-held adage that significant muscle loss is unavoidable when losing weight through exercise and diet. In the report, scientists show that consuming twice the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of protein while adhering to a diet and exercise plan prevents the loss of muscle mass and promotes fat loss. Tripling the RDA of protein, however, failed to provide additional benefits.Share This:”It is our hope that the findings from this well-controlled study will be discussed and cited by the Institute of Medicine for the updated Dietary Reference Intakes on protein,” said Stefan M. Pasiakos, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Military Nutrition Division at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, MA. “We believe that the RDA for protein should be based on a level to optimize health, as well as prevent deficiencies, and our data demonstrate a potential inadequacy of the current RDA for sparing muscle mass during weight loss, which may affect a significant portion of the population.”To make this discovery, Pasiakos and colleagues assigned young men and women controlled diets for 31 days that provided dietary protein at three different levels: 1) the U.S. RDA, 2) twice the U.S. RDA, and 3) three times the U.S. RDA. …

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Personal goals may facilitate or hinder older adults’ striving for exercise

Aug. 28, 2013 — Although exercise may significantly promote healthy aging, many older adults remain sedentary. Based on a study conducted in the Gerontology Research Center at the University of Jyväskylä, one reason for this may lie behind older adults’ personal goals.Share This:”We noticed that those older women who had personal goals related to their own or other people’s health, or to independent living, less frequently set exercise as one of their personal goals. Thus it seems that when life situation requires focusing goals on health issues or simply managing daily life at home, people may not have the energy to strive for exercise activity,” says doctoral student Milla Saajanaho from the Gerontology Research Center.The results of the study showed that those older women who had set exercise as one of their personal goals were more likely to exercise actively and also maintained their exercise activity higher in an eight-year follow-up. Personal goals related to cultural activities and to busying oneself around home further increased the likelihood for high exercise activity. Being generally active in life also seems to be beneficial for exercise activity.-“When we are trying to promote older adults’ exercise activity, we should always take into account their individual life situation, which may require focusing on other things in life instead of exercising. By considering all personal goals a person has, we could also find ways to include exercise into his/her life. And as so many older adults have personal goals related to health, it would be beneficial to remember that striving for exercise is also beneficial for maintaining health and functioning,” Saajanaho concludes.The study was conducted in the Gerontology Research Center, which is a joint effort between the University of Jyväskylä and the University of Tampere, and it is part of the Finnish Twin study on Ageing. In total 308 women between the ages of 66 to 79 participated in the study.Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland), via AlphaGalileo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. …

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Exercise is no quick cure for insomnia

Aug. 15, 2013 — Exercise is a common prescription for insomnia. But spending 45 minutes on the treadmill one day won’t translate into better sleep that night, according to new Northwestern Medicine® research.”If you have insomnia you won’t exercise yourself into sleep right away,” said lead study author Kelly Glazer Baron, a clinical psychologist and director of the behavioral sleep program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “It’s a long-term relationship. You have to keep at it and not get discouraged.”This is the first long-term study to show aerobic exercise during the day does not result in improved sleep that same night when people have existing sleep problems. Most studies on the daily effects of exercise and sleep have been done with healthy sleepers.The study also showed people exercise less following nights with worse sleep.”Sleeping poorly doesn’t change your aerobic capacity, but it changes people’s perception of their exertion,” Baron said. “They feel more exhausted.”The study will be published August 15 in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Baron conducted the study with coauthor Kathryn Reid, research associate professor of neurology at Feinberg and senior author Phyllis Zee, M.D., the Benjamin and Virginia T. Boshes Professor of Neurology at Feinberg and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.”This new study shows exercise and sleep affect each other in both directions: regular long-term exercise is good for sleep but poor sleep can also lead to less exercise. So in the end, sleep still trumps everything as far as health is concerned,” Zee said.Baron decided to analyze the daily effect of exercise after hearing her patients with insomnia complain the exercise she recommended didn’t help them right away.”They’d say, ‘I exercised so hard yesterday and didn’t sleep at all,'” Baron said. …

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