2 weeks since last chemo and feeling good!

I have turned the corner and feel normal again! I am back doing what I enjoy in life and have energy combined with stamina …. well for a couple of hours at a time anyway!!It has taken 2 weeks since my last chemotherapy to actually feel any energy and where breathing is less restricted/shallow.Congrats to Steve and Linda Wride in UK – today Steve celebrates 5 years since he was diagnosed – no doubt a very special celebration dinner is planned!Mavis Nye another beautiful and brave Mesothelioma warrior in the UK has started on a new trial today. Sending positive vibes to Mavis and others who are undertaking this trial now or very shortly.Rohan who has just had extensive Mesothelioma surgery in Sydney, NSW is coming out …

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Fatigue and returning to normality!

Underlying fatigue sets in after basis exertion, however it does not stop me from getting on with my life while undergoing chemotherapy! I simply stop and have a rest then keep going …. . I have to be careful with my shallow breathing and do stop and rest if need be. Slowly returning to normality. Weds will be day 14 since chemo.When in Washington, April 2014 I was presented with the 2014 Alan Reinstein Award (ADAO Asbestos Disease Awareness Organisation) at the annual global asbestos awareness conference for my commitment to education, advocacy and support to countless patients and families around the world. Unfortunately my beautiful crystal teardrop award was broken on the tip in transit. Linda Reinstein, ADAO kindly organised a replacement award to be sent to my home in …

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Computer literate again! High tea and good bye to a beautiful mesothelioma warrior and dear friend.

Hurrah! After 3 weeks of putting up with our ancient computer that failed recently due to an electrical storm we have bought a new computer and Keith set it up last night. So much quicker for everything. For those that are MAC freaks I hate to disappoint you – we have another PC!Last Saturday 1 February 2014 was the inaugural Ban Asbestos Conference to be held in Pakistan thanks to the Syed Fareed Ahmed Memorial Mesothelioma General Hospital Foundation and in particular Syed Mezab Ahmed and his father who bravely took on the cause/case after their uncle/brother died of tongue cancer caused by exposure to asbestos while working in Pakistan. It is a credit to both of them holding this conference and showing much needed awareness and education. …

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This week guests staying, chemo tomorrow ….

This week has flown! A visit last Tuesday to the hospital for my Picc line to be dressed and bloods taken. No chemo that week was scheduled and just as well – my bloods were still quite low from the week before. Tomorrow picc line to be dressed, bloods taken, appt with my oncologist and the green light for chemo to go ahead gemcidibine and carboplatin.We have had friends staying for 5 nights from the Gold Coast, Queensland – it was great to be normal for a few days and concentrate on other things instead of chemotherapy/treatments. I held a dinner party the first night as it was Margit’s birthday. Spinach and ricotta cannelloni followed by a pear/walnut upside down cake. I was quite exhausted the next …

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Day 8 after 2 chemo treatments

I am feeling like bile is coming up and not tasting too good! Not a pleasant feeling however one that will pass eventually.Sleep was from 10pm to 2.30am so improving each day. My face is still slightly swollen and I feel bloated, otherwise feeling much improved!This morning when the sun comes up … it is now 4am … we will be going out in the car. Where we live it is just so beautiful especially at this time of the year. Each afternoon I am pottering in my garden, getting a few small weeds out before they grow into a problem, transplanting violets/forget me knots … that are now showing thier little heads everywhere and just enjoying being with nature. Yesterday afternoon when the sun came out …

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Life is good!

Good soaking rain here – fabulous for our garden and all of the plants that are coming up due to our beautiful Spring weather, plus the new plants that I have been busy putting into pots and in the garden. In a month it should look wonderful … then lol our hot dry weather will start once again and we will have to be careful with the tank water and hope we get rain then for the garden and to fill up the tanks … however that is a couple of months away thank goodness.Well today’s visit to day chemotherapy ward at John Fawkner Hospital in Melbourne took an hour by car – good traffic flow and we were there on time for our appointment at 11am. Picc actually had …

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Life between chemotherapy! Visit to Melbourne and National Mesothelioma Day

Yesterday I caught the trains to Melbourne (3 trains altogether) and visited my daughter Jo and beautiful little grandkids including little Oliver who is now 5 weeks old. It was so nice to be able to visit and not have the dreaded side effects of chemo hanging over my head while there and travelling! We even went to the park in the afternoon while the weather cleared and the wind stopped for a little while.I caught a Melbourne old tram along Chapel Street to Bridge Road Richmond and walked up the hill to Epworth hospital where I surprised a lovely guy called David who was diagnosed in April 2013 with pleural mesothelioma after returning home from a cruise and deciding to mow his lawn only to find himself …

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Chemo postponed today due to very low bloods!

This morning a race in traffic to Melbourne for 9.45am appointment at day chemo ward (John Fawkner Hospital) for my PICC clean and dressing/blood taken and across to see Allan Zimet my oncologist for results of the blood test and okay for chemotherapy at 10.45am. Keith took my bloods up to pathology and waited a good half hour for the slip of paper with results.We waited over an hour for our appointment to see Allan as he had so many patients to see. We knew by the results of the bloods that chemo would not be happening as all very low. Lyall who has peritoneal meso, a long term survivor and good friend was due to come and see me while having chemo. I rang …

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Bizarre alignment of planetary nebulae

Sep. 4, 2013 — The final stages of life for a star like our Sun result in the star blowing its outer layers out into the surrounding space, forming objects known as planetary nebulae in a wide range of beautiful and striking shapes. One type of such nebulae, known as bipolar planetary nebulae, create ghostly hourglass or butterfly shapes around their parent stars.All these nebulae formed in different places and have different characteristics. And neither the individual nebulae, nor the stars that formed them, would have interacted with other planetary nebulae. However, a new study by astronomers from the University of Manchester, UK, now shows surprising similarities between some of these nebulae: many of them line up in the sky in the same way [1].”This really is a surprising find and, if it holds true, a very important one,” explains Bryan Rees of the University of Manchester, one of the paper’s two authors. “Many of these ghostly butterflies appear to have their long axes aligned along the plane of our galaxy. By using images from both Hubble and the NTT we could get a really good view of these objects, so we could study them in great detail.”The astronomers looked at 130 planetary nebulae in the Milky Way’s central bulge. They identified three different types [2], and peered closely at their characteristics and appearance.”While two of these populations were completely randomly aligned in the sky, as expected, we found that the third — the bipolar nebulae — showed a surprising preference for a particular alignment,” says the paper’s second author Albert Zijlstra, also of the University of Manchester. “While any alignment at all is a surprise, to have it in the crowded central region of the galaxy is even more unexpected.”Planetary nebulae are thought to be sculpted by the rotation of the star system from which they form. This is dependent on the properties of this system — for example, whether it is a binary [3], or has a number of planets orbiting it, both of which may greatly influence the form of the blown bubble. …

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Self-fertilizing plants contribute to their own demise

June 10, 2013 — Many plants are self-fertilizing, meaning they act as both mother and father to their own seeds. This strategy — known as selfing — guarantees reproduction but, over time, leads to reduced diversity and the accumulation of harmful mutations. A new study published in the scientific journal Nature Genetics shows that these negative consequences are apparent across a selfing plant’s genome, and can arise more rapidly than previously thought.In the study, an international consortium led by Stephen Wright in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto sequenced the genome of the plant species Capsella rubella, commonly known as Red Shepherd’s Purse. They found clear evidence that harmful mutations were accumulating over the species’ relatively short existence.”The results underscore the long-term advantages of outcrossing, which is the practice of mating between individuals, that gives us the wide array of beautiful flowers,” said Wright. “Selfing is a good short-term strategy but over long timescales may lead to extinction.”Red Shepherd’s Purse is a very young species that has been self-fertilizing for less than 200,000 years. It is therefore especially well-suited for studying the early effects of self-fertilization. By contrasting Red Shepherd’s Purse with the outcrossing species that gave rise to it, the researchers showed that self-fertilization has already left traces across the genome of Red Shepherd’s Purse.”Harmful mutations are always happening,” said Wright. “In crops, they could reduce yield just as harmful mutations in humans can cause disease. The mutations we were looking at are changes in the DNA that change the protein sequence and structure.”The findings represent a major breakthrough in the study of self-fertilization.”It is expected that harmful mutations should accumulate in selfing species, but it has been difficult to support this claim in the absence of large-scale genomic data,” says lead author Tanja Slotte, a past member of Wright’s research team and now a researcher at Uppsala University. “The results help to explain why ancient self-fertilizing lineages are rare, and support the long-standing hypothesis that the process is an evolutionary dead-end and leads to extinction.”The researchers said that with many crops known to be self-fertilizing, the study highlights the importance of preserving crop genetic variation to avoid losses in yield due to mutations accumulating.

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A lucky catch: A tiny new fish, Haptoclinus dropi, from the southern Caribbean

June 5, 2013 — A new species of tiny blenniiform fish has been discovered in the biodiversity rich waters of the southern Caribbean.Haptoclinus dropiis only around 2cm in length with a beautiful color pattern that includes iridescence on the fins. The proposed common name of the species is four-fin blenny, due to the division of the dorsal fin into four sections, which is a distinguishing feature of the genus and unique among blenniiform fishes. The study was published in the open access journalZookeys.Share This:This beautiful new species was discovered as a lucky bycatch during targeted specimen catching at 157-167 m depth off Curaçao as a part of the Smithsonian Institution’sDeep Reef Observation Project (DROP). The new species,Haptoclinus dropi, gets its name from the project’s abbreviation and is one of numerous new ray-finned fish species emerging from this project.For DROP expeditions theSubstation Curaçao’s manned submersible Curasub was used to catch specimens. While generally used as tourist attraction because it travels at much greater depths than divers can reach, the Curasub is also used for scientific marine research. Targeted fish specimens are collected with the sub’s two flexible, hydraulic arms, but very often small non-targeted fish are also caught in the process.”Below the depths accessible using scuba gear and above the depths typically targeted by deep-diving submersibles, tropical deep reefs are productive ocean ecosystems that science has largely missed. They are home to diverse assemblages of new and rare species that we are only just beginning to understand,” explains the lead author of the study Dr Carole Baldwin,Smithsonian Institution.Share this story on Facebook, Twitter, and Google:Other social bookmarking and sharing tools:|Story Source: The above story is reprinted from materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. …

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