2 weeks since last chemo and feeling good!

I have turned the corner and feel normal again! I am back doing what I enjoy in life and have energy combined with stamina …. well for a couple of hours at a time anyway!!It has taken 2 weeks since my last chemotherapy to actually feel any energy and where breathing is less restricted/shallow.Congrats to Steve and Linda Wride in UK – today Steve celebrates 5 years since he was diagnosed – no doubt a very special celebration dinner is planned!Mavis Nye another beautiful and brave Mesothelioma warrior in the UK has started on a new trial today. Sending positive vibes to Mavis and others who are undertaking this trial now or very shortly.Rohan who has just had extensive Mesothelioma surgery in Sydney, NSW is coming out …

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More breast cancer screening needed in younger women

Sep. 9, 2013 — A new analysis published online Sept. 9 in Cancer confirms the need for greater use of annual mammography in women ages 40-49 as recommended by the American Cancer Society, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging for all women 40 and older. It also confirms that, even with new therapeutics and protocols for treating breast cancer, regular mammography screening is still the best way to significantly reduce breast cancer deaths.The study, which involved 7,301 patients, found that 71 percent of confirmed breast cancer deaths occurred in the 20 percent of the study population that did not receive regular mammograms. The majority of those who died from breast cancer never had a mammogram prior to diagnosis. If treatment were the primary survival factor, deaths would not have been so prevalent among the non-screened group.Moreover, 50 percent of the breast cancer deaths occurred in women under the age of 50, while only 13 percent were in women ages 70 or older. For women who died of breast cancer, the median age at diagnosis was 49; for those dying of any other cause, the median age at diagnosis was 72. This suggests that women under 50 are a primary group in which greater screening compliance would provide the greatest benefit.”These findings should quiet those who argue that women age 40-49 do not need regular mammography screening. In fact, these women need annual screening — as do all women 40 and older. This is the message physicians should be promoting,” said Barbara S. …

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UCSB study reveals that overthinking can be detrimental to human performance

Aug. 7, 2013 — Trying to explain riding a bike is difficult because it is an implicit memory. The body knows what to do, but thinking about the process can often interfere. So why is it that under certain circumstances paying full attention and trying hard can actually impede performance? A new UC Santa Barbara study, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience, reveals part of the answer.There are two kinds of memory: implicit, a form of long-term memory not requiring conscious thought and expressed by means other than words; and explicit, another kind of long-term memory formed consciously that can be described in words. Scientists consider these distinct areas of function both behaviorally and in the brain.Long-term memory is supported by various regions in the prefrontal cortex, the newest part of the brain in terms of evolution and the part of the brain responsible for planning, executive function, and working memory. “A lot of people think the reason we’re human is because we have the most advanced prefrontal cortex,” said the study’s lead author, Taraz Lee, a postdoctoral scholar working in UCSB’s Action Lab.Two previous brain studies have shown that taxing explicit memory resources improved recognition memory without awareness. The results suggest that implicit perceptual memory can aid performance on recognition tests. So Lee and his colleagues decided to test whether the effects of the attentional control processes associated with explicit memory could directly interfere with implicit memory.Lee’s study used continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to temporarily disrupt the function of two different parts of the prefrontal cortex, the dorsolateral and ventrolateral. The dorsal and ventral regions are close to each other but have slightly different functions. …

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