Sustaining Injuries on Construction Sites

Sustaining Injuries on Construction Sites

Sustaining Injuries on Construction SitesWork in the construction industry is physically demanding and incredibly dangerous. Varied terrain, unpredictable weather, and ever-changing surroundings are a few of the many factors that can predispose to a construction-related injury. Falls from scaffolding or ladders, injury from falling debris, machinery accidents, and electrocution are all examples of what can happen when something goes […]

via The Personal Injury Blog – The Injury HelpLine:

Work in the construction industry is physically demanding and incredibly dangerous. Varied terrain, unpredictable weather, and ever-changing surroundings are a few of the many factors that can predispose to a construction-related injury. Falls from scaffolding or ladders, injury from falling debris, machinery accidents, and electrocution are all examples of what can happen when something goes wrong on a construction site, either as a result of an accident or due to negligence.It goes without saying that the injuries in the construction industry can be severe. Sprains, strains, broken bones, and even death can occur. When occupational injuries and illnesses are reported, one of the key measures of injury severity is the median number of days spent away from work per each injured case. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2011, the construction industry ranked third, with a median number of 14 days spent away from work due to injury. Only the mining and transportation industries ranked higher.In addition, for many years, construction workers have experienced the highest number of fatal occupational injuries among workers in all industries. Despite a 42% decline in the number of fatal injuries in the industry since 2006, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the private construction industry had the highest number of job-related fatalities in 2010, with a total of 774 deaths reported.It is possible that these numbers do not accurately represent the full scope of fatal accidents that occur in the construction industry. For example, many experts believe that the 42% decline in construction-related deaths is likely due to adverse economic conditions that have lowered recent demand for the services of the construction industry. In addition, a recent report from the Center for Construction Research and Training noted that the data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not include self-employed or federal workers, who comprise roughly 25% of the U.S. …

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The Personal Injury Blog – The Injury HelpLine

Sustaining Injuries on Construction Sites

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