Workers Compensation

Workers Compensation

Workers CompensationDespite the best actions of employers and employees, accidents on the job do happen. Whether an employee works behind a desk, drives behind a wheel, or stands behind a counter, things can go wrong and injuries can occur. Regardless of their nature, injuries and illnesses have financial, emotional, and personal costs – including lost wages, […]

via The Personal Injury Blog – The Injury HelpLine:

Despite the best actions of employers and employees, accidents on the job do happen. Whether an employee works behind a desk, drives behind a wheel, or stands behind a counter, things can go wrong and injuries can occur. Regardless of their nature, injuries and illnesses have financial, emotional, and personal costs – including lost wages, lost earning potential, and physical pain and suffering.In the event of a job-related injury, laws are in place to protect workers’ rights. In every state but Texas, almost all employers are required by law to carry workers’ compensation insurance in order to cover medical expenses that result from work-related illnesses and injuries, and to partially replace workers’ lost wages.This mandate incurs a large cost for employers.A report from the National Academy of Social Insurance indicated that in 2007, 131 million U.S. workers were covered by workers’ compensation insurance at a cost of $85 billion dollars to employers. If those numbers seem extreme, consider these numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics:Nearly three million cases of non-fatal illness and injury were documented in the private sector in 2011, equal to a rate of 3.5 cases per every 100 full-time workers. A key measure of the severity of injuries and illnesses is the median number of days away from work, which was eight days for 2011, and virtually unchanged from the three previous years. In 2010, nearly 4,700 workers died as a result of injuries sustained while at work – which translates to one worker dying every two hours from a job-related injury. Highway incidents remain the most common cause of fatal occupational injuries, followed by falls, workplace homicides, and being struck by objects. In 2010, the private construction industry experienced the highest number of fatal occupational injuries (774), while the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industry had the highest fatal work injury rate (27.9 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers). …

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The Personal Injury Blog – The Injury HelpLine

Workers Compensation

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