Soccer-related facial fractures examined

Soccer-related facial fractures examined

Fractures of the nose and other facial bones are a relatively common and potentially serious injury in soccer players, reports a Brazilian study. Through their analysis, researchers report that he nose and upper jaw (maxilla) accounted for 35 percent of fractures and the cheekbone (zygomatic bone) for another 35 percent. Most of the remaining fractures were of the lower jaw (mandible) and eye socket (orbit). Eighty-seven percent of the injuries were caused by collision with another player; the rest occurred when the player was struck by the ball.

via Cosmetic Surgery News — ScienceDaily:

Fractures of the nose and other facial bones are a relatively common and potentially serious injury in soccer players, reports a Brazilian study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery — Global Open , the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).On the eve of the 2014 World Cup, a group of Brazilian plastic surgeons review their experience with soccer-related facial fractures requiring surgery. Dr. Dov Charles Goldenberg, MD, PhD, of University of So Paulo and colleagues write, “Due to exposure and the lack of protection for the face, the occasional maxillofacial trauma sustained during soccer games often entails serious facial injuries requiring hospital admissions and invasive procedures.”Soccer Players at Risk of Nasal and Other Facial FracturesThe researchers assembled data on 45 patients undergoing surgical treatment for soccer-related facial fractures at two large university hospital centers in So Paulo between 2000 and 2013. The 45 soccer injuries accounted for two percent of surgically treated facial fractures during that time. Forty-four of the patients were male; the average age was 28 years. All of the injured players were amateurs.The nose and upper jaw (maxilla) accounted for 35 percent of fractures and the cheekbone (zygomatic bone) for another 35 percent. Most of the remaining fractures were of the lower jaw (mandible) and eye socket (orbit). Eighty-seven percent of the injuries were caused by collision with another player; the rest occurred when the player was struck by the ball.Nasal fractures were treated by repositioning (reducing) the fractured bones to their proper place and splinting until they healed. Other types of facial fractures required open surgery and internal fixation (plates, screws) to reposition the bones. The patients remained in the hospital for about five days on average, and were told they could return to play after six to eight weeks of healing.Emphasis on Awareness and Examination to Detect Soccer-Related FracturesThe results are consistent with previous studies of soccer-related facial injuries. …

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Cosmetic Surgery News — ScienceDaily

Soccer-related facial fractures examined

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