Soil microbes shift as shrubs invade remnant hill prairies

Soil microbes shift as shrubs invade remnant hill prairies

Perched high on the bluffs of the big river valleys in the Midwest are some of the last remnants of never-farmed prairie grasslands. These patches, edged by forest, are slowly being taken over by shrubs. A recent study examined the soil microbes on nine patches, also called “balds,” that had varying degrees of shrub invasion and found an interesting shift in the composition of the microbial community.

via Ecology Research News — ScienceDaily:

Perched high on the bluffs of the big river valleys in the Midwest are some of the last remnants of never-farmed prairie grasslands. These patches, edged by forest, are slowly being taken over by shrubs. A recent University of Illinois study examined the soil microbes on nine patches, also called “balds,” that had varying degrees of shrub invasion and found an interesting shift in the composition of the microbial community.”When we looked at the soil samples from a lightly encroached hill prairie remnant, it was very clear that there was a set of fungi that look like grassland fungi, a set of fungi that look like tree fungi, and the shrubs between the two have some features of both,” said U of I microbial ecologist Tony Yannarell. “As the degree of shrub encroachment increased, the amount of change in the fungal communities also increased, and as the degree of shrub encroachment increased, that shrub fungi joined the forest group to become one big woody community.”Yannarell said that on the balds that were completely encroached, the soil samples across the entire remnant were the same. “You get this shift toward woody fungal communities that mirror how much shrub density you have in the hill prairie,” he said.Yannarell said that forest and prairie microbial communities are always very different from each other even in this case where they are only a couple of meters apart. And because of the close proximity, with the same overall climate conditions and soil origin, they could rule out a lot of factors that would normally affect a change in microbial community structure.The microbes in the shrub soil tend to be different, but different parts of the microbial community change in relationship to the shrub, to the forest, to the prairie. The shrub bacteria are more like what they found in open prairie than in the forest. But the shrub fungi looked a lot more like the forest fungi.”We think what we found is the signature of these early changes, these early shifts of microbial communities toward a woody fungal community,” Yannarell said. “This first study only reveals one side of the change. We think we can firmly conclude that there are some woody, plant-liking fungi. …

For more info: Soil microbes shift as shrubs invade remnant hill prairies

Ecology Research News — ScienceDaily

Soil microbes shift as shrubs invade remnant hill prairies

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