A shocking diet: Researchers describe microbe that ‘eats’ electricity

A shocking diet: Researchers describe microbe that ‘eats’ electricity

Researchers have shown that the commonly found bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris can use natural conductivity to pull electrons from minerals located remotely in soil and sediment while remaining at the surface, where they absorb the sunlight needed to produce energy.

via All Top News — ScienceDaily:

There have been plenty of fad diets that captured the public’s imagination over the years, but Harvard scientists have identified what may be the strangest of them all — sunlight and electricity.Led by Peter Girguis, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences, and Arpita Bose, a post-doctoral fellow in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, a team of researchers showed that the commonly found bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris can use natural conductivity to pull electrons from minerals located deep in soil and sediment while remaining at the surface, where they absorb the sunlight needed to produce energy. The study is described in a February 26 paper in Nature Communications.”When you think about electricity and living organisms, most people default to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, but we’ve long understood that all organisms actually use electrons — what constitutes electricity — to do work,” Girguis said. “At the heart of this paper is a process called extracellular electron transfer (EET), which involves moving electrons in and out of cells. What we were able to show is that these microbes take up electricity, which goes into their central metabolism, and we were able to describe some of the systems that are involved in that process.”In the wild, the microbes rely on iron to provide the electrons they need to fuel energy generation, but tests in the lab suggest the iron itself isn’t critical for this process. By attaching an electrode to colonies of the microbes in the lab, researchers observed that they could take up electrons from a non-ferrous source, suggesting they might also use other electron-rich minerals — such as other metals and sulfur compounds — in the wild.”That’s a game-changer,” Girguis said. “We have understood for a long time that the aerobic and anaerobic worlds interact mainly through the diffusion of chemicals into and out of those domains. Accordingly, we also believe this process of diffusion governs the rates of many biogeochemical cycles. But this research indicates…that this ability to do EET is, in a sense, an end-run around diffusion. That could change the way we think about the interactions between the aerobic and anaerobic worlds, and might change the way we calculate the rates of biogeochemical cycling.”Using genetic tools, researchers were also able to identify a gene that is critical to the ability to take up electrons. …

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All Top News — ScienceDaily

A shocking diet: Researchers describe microbe that ‘eats’ electricity

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