National U.S. study reveals how urban lawn care habits vary

National U.S. study reveals how urban lawn care habits vary

What do people living in Boston, Baltimore, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, and Los Angeles have in common? From coast to coast, prairie to desert — residential lawns reign. But, according to a new study, beneath this sea of green lie unexpected differences in fertilization and irrigation practices.

via Ecology Research News — ScienceDaily:

What do people living in Boston, Baltimore, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Phoenix, and Los Angeles have in common? From coast to coast, prairie to desert — residential lawns reign.But, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, beneath this sea of green lie unexpected differences in fertilization and irrigation practices. Understanding urban lawn care is vital to sustainability planning, more than 80% of Americans live in cities and their suburbs, and these numbers continue to grow.The study was undertaken to test “the homogenization hypothesis.” Peter Groffman, a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and one of the paper’s authors explains, “Neighborhoods in very different parts of the country look remarkably alike, from lawns and roads to water features. This study is the first to test if urbanization produces similar land management behaviors, independent of the local environment.”Some 9,500 residents in the six study cities were queried about their lawn care habits. The research team, led by Colin Polsky of Clark University and colleagues at 10 other institutions, took into account differences in climate and neighborhood socioeconomics, both within and between cities. A focus was put on fertilization and irrigation, practices with potentially hefty environmental price tags.Fertilizer is rich in nitrogen and phosphorus. This stimulates lawn growth, but when fertilizer washes into waterways, it causes algal blooms that degrade water quality and rob oxygen from fish and other aquatic life. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, landscape irrigation accounts for nearly one-third of residential water use nationwide.Some 79% of surveyed residents watered their lawns and 64% applied fertilizer. Groffman comments, “These numbers are important when we bear in mind that lawns cover more land in the United States than any other irrigated crop. …

For more info: National U.S. study reveals how urban lawn care habits vary

Ecology Research News — ScienceDaily

National U.S. study reveals how urban lawn care habits vary

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