Fertilizer in small doses yields higher returns for less money

Fertilizer in small doses yields higher returns for less money

Crop yields in the fragile semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe have been declining over time due to a decline in soil fertility resulting from mono-cropping, lack of fertilizer, and other factors. Researchers have evaluated the use of a precision farming technique called “microdosing,” its effect on food security, and its ability to improve yield at a low cost to farmers.

via Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily:

Crop yields in the fragile semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe have been declining over time due to a decline in soil fertility resulting from mono-cropping, lack of fertilizer, and other factors. In collaboration with the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), University of Illinois researchers evaluated the use of a precision farming technique called “microdosing,” its effect on food security, and its ability to improve yield at a low cost to farmers.”Microdosing involves applying a small, affordable amount of fertilizer with the seed at planting time or as top dressing three to four weeks after emergence,” explained U of I agricultural economist Alex Winter-Nelson. “So, instead of spreading fertilizer over the entire field, microdosing uses fertilizer more efficiently and ultimately improves productivity. Our research shows that smallholder farmers’ investment in microdosing has really unlocked the power of chemical fertilizers in some of the low-rainfall areas of Zimbabwe.”Training is the key to adoption of the technique. “About 75 percent of households receiving microdosing training used fertilizer in 2011,” said Winter-Nelson. “This compares to less than 25 percent of households that had not received training. Another way of looking at it is that training in microdosing raised the probability of adoption by 30 to 35 percentage points. Knowledge of microdosing changed people’s attitudes about fertilizer. Those who had training generally disagreed with the common notion that fertilizer is not worth its price or that it burns crops.”Winter-Nelson said that there are some hurdles to overcome, however. “Sustaining and expanding the benefits of microdosing technology will require efforts to ensure that private agrodealers are able to stock the product in a timely manner and to package it in a manner that smallholder farmers find useful,” he said. …

For more info: Fertilizer in small doses yields higher returns for less money

Agriculture and Food News — ScienceDaily

Fertilizer in small doses yields higher returns for less money

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