Gene deletion affects early language and brain white matter

Gene deletion affects early language and brain white matter

A chromosomal deletion is associated with changes in the brain’s white matter and delayed language acquisition in youngsters from Southeast Asia or with ancestral connections to the region, said an international consortium led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine. However, many such children who can be described as late-talkers may overcome early speech and language difficulties as they grow.

via ScienceDaily: Top Health News:

June 27, 2013 — A chromosomal deletion is associated with changes in the brain’s white matter and delayed language acquisition in youngsters from Southeast Asia or with ancestral connections to the region, said an international consortium led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine. However, many such children who can be described as late-talkers may overcome early speech and language difficulties as they grow.The finding involved both cutting edge technology and two physicians with an eye for unusual clinical findings. Dr. Seema R. Lalani, a physician-scientist at BCM and Dr. Jill V. Hunter, professor of radiology at BCM and Texas Children’s Hospital, worked together to identify this genetic change responsible for expressive language delay and brain changes in children, predominantly from Southeast Asia.Lalani, assistant professor of molecular and human genetics at BCM, is a clinical geneticist and also signs out diagnostic studies called chromosomal microarray analysis, a gene chip that helps identify abnormalities in specific genes and chromosomes, as part of her work at BCM’s Medical Genetics Laboratory.”I got intrigued when I kept seeing this small (genomic) change in children from a large sample of more than 15,000 children referred for chromosomal microarray analysis at Baylor College of Medicine. These children were predominantly Burmese refugees or of Vietnamese ancestry living in the United States. It started with two children whom I evaluated at Texas Children’s Hospital and soon realized that there was a pattern of early language delay and brain imaging abnormalities in these individuals carrying this deletion from this part of the world. Within a period of two to three years, we found 13 more families with similar problems, having the same genetic change. …

For more info: Gene deletion affects early language and brain white matter

ScienceDaily: Top Health News

Gene deletion affects early language and brain white matter

Utilizzando il sito, accetti l'utilizzo dei cookie da parte nostra. maggiori informazioni

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close