Female moths use olfactory signals to choose the best egg-laying sites

Female moths use olfactory signals to choose the best egg-laying sites

Researchers have discovered that the ability of Manduca sexta moths to recognize changes in the profile of volatile compounds released by plants being attacked by Manduca caterpillars allows them to lay their eggs on plants that are less likely to be attacked by insects and other predators, and to avoid competing against other caterpillars of the same species for resources.

via ScienceDaily: Ecology News:

June 3, 2013 — Functional calcium imaging in the antennal lobes of a female Manduca sexta moth: Different activation patterns (red spots) can be observed depending on whether the moths respond to (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate or (E)-2-hexenyl acetate. The odor of a (Z)-3-isomer or a (Z)-3 / (E)-2 ratio in favor of a (Z)-3-isomer − according to the odor bouquet of an unattacked plant − guides ovipositing Manduca females to plants that have yet been spared by herbivorous caterpillars. Copyright: Anna Späthe, MPI Chem. Ecol.Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany, discovered that the ability of Manduca sexta moths to recognize changes in the profile of volatile compounds released by plants being attacked by Manduca caterpillars allows them to lay their eggs on plants that are less likely to be attacked by insects and other predators, and to avoid competing against other caterpillars of the same species for resources. The results of field experiments and neurobiological studies were now published in the open access online journal eLIFE. (eLIFE, May 14, 2013, DOI: 10.7554/elife.00421)”Green” leaf odorsPlants have developed many different strategies to defend themselves against herbivorous animals, particularly insects. In addition to mechanical defenses such as thorns and spines, plants also produce compounds that keep insects and other herbivores at bay by acting as repellents or toxins. Some of these metabolites are produced on a continuous basis by plants, whereas others — notably compounds called green-leaf volatiles — are mainly produced once the plant has been wounded or attacked. Green-leaf volatiles — which are also responsible for the smell of freshly cut grass — have been observed to provide plants with both direct protection, by inhibiting or repelling herbivores, and indirect protection, by attracting predators of the herbivores themselves.Attracting the enemies of the herbivoresThe hawkmoth Manduca sexta lays its eggs on various plants, including tobacco and Sacred Datura plants (Datura wrightii). Once the eggs have hatched into caterpillars, they start eating the leaves of their host plant, and if present in large numbers, these caterpillars can quickly defoliate and destroy the plant. …

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ScienceDaily: Ecology News

Female moths use olfactory signals to choose the best egg-laying sites

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